Sunday, October 30, 2016

A Free Crochet Pattern: Peacock Hood

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I loved crocheting this Peacock Hood!  I was lucky enough to get my hands on a couple of Caron Cakes in Gelato during the initial release.  I knew I wanted to crochet something using the crocodile stitch and, after much frogging and indecision, happened to create this adorable hood.

I must admit, I was originally hoping that this could be a one skein project, but that didn't happen.  It uses about one and a third.  (Which means that I have another Caron Cakes project in the works!)

I used my H hook.


A bit of a disclaimer: This is an untested pattern.  I wrote the pattern using the notes that I made while crocheting.  If you make this pattern I do welcome your comments and corrections, but please be kind.
1. Chain 109.   This is a multiple of 6 + 1, which is generally recommended for a crocodile stitch starting chain.  (It's 18 x 6 and then add one.)

2. Build your feather foundation, also sometimes referred to as the crocodile stitch ladder.  Do this by chaining three (which will act as your first double crochet stitch). Double crochet into the fourth chain from the hook.  *Chain one.  Skip two chains. Two double crochet into next stitch.* Repeat till end where you should work two dc into the final chain.


3. Turn your foundation ladder so that it is hanging down.To make each feather (or crocidele scale), you’re going to work stitches around the posts of the double crochet stitches that serve as the ladder rungs.   *Chain one then five double crochets down the post of the ladder, chain one, and then five double crochets up the post of the other rung pair. Skip the next pair of rungs.*   Continue along the length of the foundation row/ladder working down and then up each set of rungs.  You should end with a feather/crocodile scale in the last pair of rungs for a total of 19 feathers.  Note: You will need to flip your work around a bit as you're working.

4.   At this point your feathers are going to look a bit ruffled.  Don't worry!  This next row works as both the foundation for the subsequent row and locks the previous row neatly into place.  You are now going to work pairs of double crochet, separated by one chain, worked into the gap between one of the pairs of double crochet stitches below.  You will alternate between working your dcs into the space between scales as well as into the gap between dcs.  This means that you should have the same number of double crochet pairs throughout this entire section and that they should line up on top of one another.


5. It's time for another row of feathers!  However, the feathers need to be offset from the row below, so this row will have 18 feathers.  Chain two, skip the first set of double crochets/ladder rungs, and work your feather into the second set.  Continue as before, with five double crochets down the post of the ladder, chain one, and then five double crochets up the post of the other rung pair. Skip the next pair of rungs.


6. Repeat steps three, four, and five until you reach your desired length, to replicate my project you need seven rows of feathers.  It works best to end on a row with 19 feathers.

7. For the final row of the scarf portion of the hoodie the locking in mechanism changes slightly.  Work as step four instructs, however, use single crochet stitches over the first four feathers, switching to double crochet between feathers four and five.  You will mirror this for the other end of the scarf; between the fifth and fourth LAST feathers switch back to single crochet.



8. Now for the hood! Slip stitch (with the v's on the wrong side) to the first double crochet group.  Work 12  feathers into the double crochet row as normal, stopping once you reach the single crochet stitches.

9. Work step four's locking in row, only crocheting in the double crochet stitches.  We are no longer worried at all about the scarf part -- that's finished!

10. Work 11 feathers, this is the offset row so it has one less.


11. Continue working rows of 12 feathers, foundation, 11 feathers until your hood is as high as you'd like.  Mine is 14 row of feathers (not including the scarf portion).

12.  For the final locking in row use single crochet instead of double crochet.

13. At this point you will have what looks like a long skinny rectangle with another rectangle on top of it.  Fold it in half and slip stitch across the top.

14. Weave in ends and enjoy!





I used one of my Lilla Rose Flexi clips as a shawl pin for Catherine's Peacock Hood.  It would be super easy to add some fun buttons or toggles as well.


14 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh I want one for myself! That is so cute! Our link party at Grandma's House just opened today, we would love to have you there!

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    1. http://www.grandmashousediy.com/wednesday-link-party-8/ Thanks!!

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  2. This is beautiful! I love the colors and that amazing stitch!!!!

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  3. This is adorable! I've always wanted to try something with a crocodile stitch and have been trying to find a good reason to buy the new Caron Cakes yarn. :) #IdeaBox

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  4. This is so pretty. Thank you for sharing it at The Crafty Corner link party. Look for your feature this week (new party begins Wednesday at 6 am EST)!

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  5. This peacock hood is beautiful!! You did an amazing job creating such a lovely crocheted piece!! Thanks for sharing the pattern!

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  6. This is gorgeous, and I love the colors! It's one of our features at this week's Funtastic Friday.

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  7. This is absolutely adorable! I love the colors! :)

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  8. Awesome job,..looks spectacular.

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  9. christine ChamberlainJanuary 19, 2017 at 6:00 PM

    I have a whole book of patterns for this stitch

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